Does your fundraising pass Google’s smartphone test?

Mobile has become a huge issue for nonprofits. Having been much slower to adapt to mobile than the commercial world, many organizations have failed to address the mobile issue or assumed that their software providers were handling it. But falling revenues, both online and off are showing the sad truth for many organizations that are not mobile ready. We’re at the point that more than half of web traffic, search traffic and ecommerce is through mobile devices. For online donations, the more alarming statistic is that the bounce rate for mobile users on mobile-unfriendly pages is almost... 

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Tags: fundraising peer-to-peer mobile friendly responsive design smartphone
DonorDrive P2P Professional Forum Scholarship recipient learns how hike her revenue.

Brecka Purnam of CureSearch DonorDrive Scholarship RecipientBack in December 2014, Brecka Putnam (who runs Ultimate Hike and is the Manager of Signature Events for CureSearch) wrote an essay that landed her the DonorDrive Peer-to-Peer Professional Forum scholarship. Her award was a trip to the P2P Professional Forum Conference in February in Orlando. This is the most attended Peer-to-peer fundraising conference in North America, packed with learning and networking opportunities specifically within the peer-to-peer space. This year we decided to dig deep to find out exactly what impact our scholarship can have on an organization, so we followed Brecka throughout the conference.

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Tags: fundraising peer-to-peer conference Peer-to-Peer Professional Forum
Jeromy Adams of Extra Life invites other nonprofits to join them.

Jeromy Adams found himself in a unique predicament with his wildly successful Extra Life Event: only a select few knew about it. For a few years the 24-hour marathon of video gaming for good had flown under the radar of the popular media while raising millions for Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals. The event was legendary in the gaming community, but no national media outlet had ever mentioned it. “I kind of wanted to keep it a secret because it didn’t seem like many were noticing what we were doing. We were kind of getting a head start in this space.”

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Video: Ed Lord talks onboarding for nonprofits.

Last year Ed Lord wrote a great article on the right way to onboard staff. This caught the attention of the Peer-to-Peer Professional Forum and at the P2P15 conference Ed was asked to speak on the topic. We recorded Ed's presentation to share with you. If you're having trouble retaining staff (and who isn't), Ed presents a simple-to-follow plan that will help you train them to be more productive with a passion for your mission and a long term commitment to your organization.

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8 ways to get your event volunteers to fundraise.

It's true that your volunteers give so much of themselves that you hate to ask them for another thing. But what might not be obvious is that they might love to get more involved and fundraise for your events. Though they may not be running or walking, they can certainly fundraise for the event they're helping with. Here are some ways you can improve volunteer involvement and encourage them to fundraise:

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Self-Directed Fundraising: It's a donor's market.

The world of fundraising is pivoting. What’s happening is that we’re moving to the next horizon, which is self-directed fundraising. Where we’re headed is fundraising that’s directed by your donors, not directed by your organization. Organizations that think that the way they’ve raised money through their long-established signature events will continue—are mistaken. Many walks and runs are now 30-year-old products that haven’t been innovated for the times. There’s fatigue, since many of those participating in these events are less likely to continue as they get older and the events are dated ideas that are just not appealing or relevant to younger people. I’m not saying that tomorrow we’ll shut off the signature-event faucet. But what we’ve seen is a continuous decline in the revenues they’re raising and the efforts to revive many of these events just haven’t worked.

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What matters in fundraising today? Check out our report.

2015 will be a watershed year for nonprofits. Many organizations are facing multiple problems: a drop off in revenue from their traditional fundraising, inability to attract new supporters, and competition for their fundraising dollars from organizations that seem to come out of nowhere, to name a few. 

To help you make these critical decisions, check out our first yearly report The State of Peer-To-Peer Fundraising 2015. Topics include:

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Infographic: Social Fundraising is up 32%.

Two years ago we examined the percentage of dollars donated through social media in DonorDrive. Back then 13.27% of all dollars our clients raised came directly through social media. (These are donations that came from a donor clicking a link in a friend's update or tweet, arriving at their fundraising page and making an online donation.) Despite the fact that social channels show fewer and fewer updates by your friends and followers, fundraising through social channels has grown to 17.46% of overall donations. That's an increase of 32%. Here's a look at how that social donation pie is divided up:

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Attracting young professionals to your organization, Part 4: Event ideas​.

You have to have a different approach to fundraising with Millennials. They‘re willing to go to an event a month. Older volunteers may want to do one big event a year. Young professionals usually prefer to do a higher volume of more intimate events. You’ve got to allow them to be creative. Millennials may want to do some events you’ve never done in your organization before. You may not think an event will work, but if they think it’ll work, you’ve got to give them the leeway to do it, even if it might fail.

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Attracting young professionals to your organization, Part 3: Structuring your group.

For a young professional group to thrive there must be structure, but not something with the overbearing rules that your traditional structure may have. You’ll still want to have a hierarchy with officers. That’s one thing that will actually attract some of your leaders. They're building their resume. They’re still looking for leadership opportunities. From your point of view, you need a structure for who’s going to run your meetings. You have to start your group with an existing board member or volunteer. But what you don’t want to do is have that older volunteer running the group. You want them to get it started and then back away and be there for advice when needed. 

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